Educational Resources

From 2007 to 2010 and again 2016 to the present, Demetri Broxton has served as the Director of Education at Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) in San Francisco, CA.  In this capacity, he develops curriculum guides to accompany all exhibitions featured in the museum's galleries. Below are a selection of curriculum guides developed by Broxton.

 

My Life in the Bush with MJ and Iggy is an exhibition of artworks by Los Angeles and Ghana-based artist Todd Gray. Composed of photographs taken throughout his life, Gray layers, splices and interweaves images of photographs taken of Michael Jackson, Iggy Pop, Ghana, and his other travels. The associated Educator’s Resource Guide provides students with questions to use during their visit to MoAD, discussion questions to dive deeper into the themes of the exhibition, further reading, and suggestions for additional lesson plans. Due to the complexity of themes presented in the exhibition, we suggest using these activities for students in grades eight and above.

The Ease of Fiction Educator’s Resource Guide explores the themes of the exhibition curated by Dexter Wimberley. The exhibition features the artworks of four artists who were born in different countries throughout the African continent and now live in the United States. Activities in this guide ask students to question popular narratives of African Diasporic identity and culture, view artworks through a critical lens, and create a self-portrait to actively express their self-identity. The activities are developed for students in grades six and above.

A Matter of Fact presents a new body of work from Toyin Ojih Odutola. With vibrant pastel and charcoal drawings developed out of her unique pen ink and pencil style, Ojih Odutola presents a meditation on the expression and constructs of wealth. From a portrait of a mother and daughter enjoying an equestrian afternoon to the commanding presentation of The Marchioness elegantly poised presiding within a mansion, these drawings allow one to recognize wealth, as it exists beyond fact or questioning.

The Where is Here Educator's Resource Guide explores the work of 10 artists who are interested in claiming, making, and describing places. The subjects of the exhibition are the experiential, material, and conceptual routes that connect people to locales, reflecting actual travel, migration and even imagined wanderings. The Resource Guide is intended for use with students in grades 3 through 12; however, the content may be adjusted to meet other levels.

The Dandy Lion Curriculum Guide examines the global trend of Black men who self-fashion themselves in a mix of intentional classical European fashion with African Diasporan aesthetics. The young men are photographed in city-landscapes across the globe, defying stereotypical and monolithic understandings of masculinity within the Black community. The lesson plans are most appropriate for grades 6 through 12. The lessons in this interdisciplinary guide connect to California Common Core State Standards in art, social studies, and language arts.

The African Continuum Curriculum Guide examines the West African cultures which gave birth to new religions and spiritual practices in the United State and the Caribbean. The lesson plans are most appropriate for grades 6 through 12. The lessons in this interdisciplinary guide connect to national standards in art, social studies, and language arts.

The Mayhew Curriculum Guide examines the work of California artist, Richard Mayhew, and themes of identity, culture, and art making which Mayhew’s work invokes. The lesson plans are most appropriate for grades, 6 through 12. The lessons in this interdisciplinary guide connect to national standards in art, social studies, and language arts.

The Let Your Motto Be Resistance Curriculum Guide examines photographs of African American leaders of resistance. The lesson plans are most appropriate for all grades, K through 12. The lessons in this interdisciplinary guide connect to national standards in art, social studies, and language arts. Lessons from the Double Exposure curriculum guide (above) connect to themes in this exhibition.

The Decoding Identity Curriculum Guide examines the work of artists who use their work to grapple with issues of identity. The lesson plans are most appropriate for grades 4 through 12, but may be modified to accommodate other grades. The lessons in this interdisciplinary guide connect to standards in art, social studies, and language arts.

The Double Exposure Curriculum Guide examines early photographic processes and images of African Americans in photography. The lesson plans are most appropriate for grades 7 through 12, but may be modified to accommodate lower grades. The lessons in this interdisciplinary guide connect to standards in art, social sciences, and language arts.

The Africa.dot.Com Curriculum Guide is an interdisciplinary guide for grades 3 through 12. The exhibition shows Africa as part of the modern digital world. This resource includes hands-on art lesson plans and writing projects connecting to language arts and social sciences.